Examples of Transition Words and Phrases

Great examples of transitional words and phrases that you can effectively use in your writing to help you create wonderful and concise writings that easily deliver the message to the target audience.

One of the primary objectives of being an effective writer is presenting your thoughts and ideas in an understandable and clear way. If you want to reach a wider audience and communicate effectively without leaving any room for readers to misunderstand you, you must be intentional with how you structure your paper. As a writer, you should never forget that incorporating transitional phrases and words in your paper could aid in creating a powerful connection to your paper.

On the same note, using transitions will make it easy for your audience to understand your intended meaning. Writers desiring to learn more about transition words can always use the link provided in this article. This article will discuss examples of transition words and phrases students can incorporate into their writing. 

The timeframe or unfolding sequence transitions

Sequence and time transitions describe how an event or activity happened or will happen. This transition improves how the reader perceives the information regarding the actual activity that took place or will take place. In case an activity is scheduled to happen, the writer uses transitions that inform the reader about the time the activity will occur without necessarily mentioning the exact time and date. In this scenario, the transitions used may include; meanwhile, at the moment, later, eventually, currently, then, now or simultaneously, momentarily, to mention just a few. An example of this in a sentence is; “We used to recruit new staff to our company every year, but currently, all the positions are occupied.”

Conclusion or summary transitions

Writers may prefer to use conclusions or summary transitions to show the end of the writing. In other words, it mentally prepares the reader for the conclusion. These transitions are fundamental to readers who get bored very fast, and the presence of these words motivates them to keep reading to the end. Examples of these transitions include, in summary, finally, consequently, thus, in conclusion, to conclude, in any event, in either case, overall, altogether, in essence, to summarize, in brief, as a result, and to sum up. An example of these transitions in a sentence is; in brief, the history of our nation began long ago, even before modern documentation could capture all of the transformations.”

Details transitions

These transitions show details that would otherwise elude the reader if they are not very keen or if the writer does not use the proper transitions. Examples include, especially, in particular, including, in detail, to list, to explain, namely and to enumerate. An example in a sentence is; “Among all the footballing nations, Brazil, in particular, has won the majority of world cup trophies.”

Importance transitions

These transitions show the emphasis on something in particular. They include, furthermore, in addition, indeed, truly, of course, really, in truth, also, above all, indeed, again, besides, in fact, and surely. An example in a sentence is, “Although parents may punish their kids to discipline them, in truth, they love them very much.”

Cause transitions

These transitions show the root causes and how they affect a particular thing’s outcome. They also show the relationship between the intention and the resulting action. These phrases and words include, due to, in the event of, as long as, for fear of, since and because of. An example of this in a sentence is, “as long as it’s raining, I will not go outside today.”

Examples transitions

These transitions show instances that something happened or is likely to happen and give samples of things. These illustrations notify the reader that the following information is not final but an example or sample of something else. These samples include, for example, in other words, for instance, to illustrate, thus, in other words, in particular and as an illustration. Here is an example of these transitions in a sentence. “Besides giving our bodies vitamins and other nutrients, vegetables also have other significant benefits; for example, they contain fibre essential in digestion.”

Contrast transitions

These transitions focus on connecting two different things by centring the attention on their differences. These transitions inform the reader about the two things, how they relate and how they differ. Writers can use these transitions to show the contrast between a good or positive thing from a bad or negative thing or can still show the difference in the performance of two things, one performing well. At the same time, the other fails to perform to expectations. Examples include; though, yet, after all, although, nevertheless, nonetheless, notwithstanding, on the contrary, on the other hand, otherwise, and yet, at the same time, but, despite, however and in contrast. Here is an example in a sentence. “Peter wants to attend his friend’s birthday party, but on the other hand, he needs to study for his final exams.” 

Space transitions 

These are transitions that point out the exact position of something or inform the reader about the space occupied by something in reference to the position of another thing. They include; beneath, under, below, along the edge, on top, at the right, at the left, in the centre, on the side, besides, behind, next to, nearby, around, above, over, straight ahead, in the background, within sight, out of sight, at the rear, at the front, in front of, at the top, at the bottom, in the surrounding, across, under, nearer and adjacent. An example of these transitions in a sentence is, “The science library is behind the administration block.” 

Recommendation transitions

These transitions are used to give a suggestion about the previous topic. These are used to inform the reader that the following information is not mandatory but just a recommendation. These transitions include, therefore, to this end and with this in mind. An example of these in a sentence is; “with this in mind, it was decided that all college students were always required to have their school identity cards while in school.” 

In conclusion, as mentioned in the introduction, if you want to reach a wider audience and communicate effectively without leaving any room for readers to misunderstand you, you must be intentional with how you structure your paper. As a writer, you should never forget that incorporating transitional phrases and words in your paper could aid in creating a powerful connection to your paper. Also Read – A Complete Guide to Finding and Using Vector Pictures in Your Designs

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